Bumping Hands

When we all met for the first time, as expected we were quite reserved, polite and understood about personal space. The politeness remained but an aspect that I had not observed in the earlier mentioned video about the Gee’s Bend women was just how physically close you have to get so we could work on the quilt.

A couple of moments stuck out for me, the first was seeing two quilters [who did not know each other before the group got together] work so closely that their hands were literally bumping. In the questionnaire’s that were completed at the end of the sessions, one person commented ‘bumping hands for the first time with someone will always make me smile’.

a-bump-1
Bumping Hands [Perren, 2015]
a-bump-2
Working Space [Perren, 2015]
The second observation was when one of the quilters was sat underneath the quilting frame, amongst the legs of her fellow workers she was trying to sort out a knot on the back of the quilt.

a-under
The Underside [Perren, 2015]
These were aspects I was keen to further explore within my own practice and highlighted the nature of my initial preference for working in isolation.

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